Home With Underfloor Heating

Home With Underfloor Heating

Wet underfloor heating systems require a series of pipes (typically forming a continuous loop between two central manifolds) which are laid Types of underfloor Heating The two basic types of underfloor heating are “wet” systems, which, unsurprisingly, involve hot water heated by a boiler, and “dry” systems, which involve electricity (and are not connected to a boiler). Furthermore, the absence of convection currents in a room prevents the circulation of dust which can be of benefit to those suffering from respiratory ailments or allergies. Radiant heat energy is absorbed, or reflected, by the walls, ceiling and furniture in a room, to provide even heating throughout.

Home With Underfloor Heating

Home With Underfloor Heating

Unlike a system of central heating radiators or convection heaters (which create a vertical temperature gradient in a room, colder at the bottom and warmer at the top), an underfloor heating system circulates a greater proportion of its heat by radiation, rather than convection. Thankfully, modern underfloor heating systems do not require an open fire; however they do operate on a similar fundamental principle. As heat rises it then provided the perfect way to heat the rooms above. The Romans relied on an innovative system of flues and ducts, to circulate hot air (heated by an open fire) beneath the floors of buildings.

Although for many this type of heating is a new concept however its history has been traced back at least 2,000 years to the Roman period and possibly to the great civilisations of the Indus Valley, before that.  Underfloor heating is one of the most energy efficient methods of heating any building.