Chippendale Furniture Design Style

Chippendale Furniture Design Style

As for determining work actually made by the hands The top rails of his chairs tended towards the yolk style and Chippendale was not shy about using some very fine fabrics with his furniture. As with most high end furniture of this time frame, mahogany was the wood of choice. The claw foot may have been exiting the furniture design period but Chippendale still incorporated it in many of his works.

As for the design elements found in Chippendale furniture – we often see the cabriole leg (meaning a graceful curve resembling an animal leg), typical for the Queen Anne period which is expected as the styles crossed-over often. He became such an important figure in English design that a statue of him can be seen gracing Victoria and Albert Museum in London. A few examples being Blair House, Nostell Priory, Harewood House and Paxton House. Many Chippendale clients’ homes (mainly English aristocrats) still house his creations.

Chippendale Furniture Design Style

Chippendale Furniture Design Style

Chippendale Furniture Design Style

Chippendale Furniture Design Style

In his mid to later years he was a sought after builder and designer designing everything from fire grates to full room schemes. He was not too well known early in his career but by the mid 1750’s he became quite well known. Unlike Hepplewhite and Sheraton, Chippendale produced a vast quantity of his own work. Although his works gave inspiration for a style on its own, Chippendale himself designed his furniture in the Rococo and Neoclassical styles. What other furniture maker has a troupe of dancers named after him?